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Apply the Code of Ethics to real life situations.

gri course

In this course you will discover:
The various Articles and Standards of Practice contained within the REALTOR® Code of Ethics
Legal compliance statutes and rules
Provisions of the Code of Ethics and state and federal statutory requirements
Ethical obligations to both your clients and fellow REALTORS®

August 22, 2018 

Hosted by: Hendersonville Board of REALTORS®
Instructor: Patrice Willetts

Online registration is HERE.

Welcome to your Closing on a House Checklist—a rundown of everything home buyers need to do in the 11th hour before they get their hands on those keys. Because when you're approaching the finish line in your home-buying journey, you want nothing to go wrong, right?

That’s why we’ve put together a home closing checklist, which outlines your action points in those few days leading up to settlement. Keep this list handy to know you've done what you need to in order to close the deal.

1. Get all contingencies squared away
Most purchase agreements have contingencies—things that buyers must do before this transaction is official, explains Jimmy Branham, a real estate agent at the Keyes Company, in Fort Lauderdale, FL. These are the most common contingencies:
Home inspection contingency: This gives buyers the right to have the home professionally inspected. If something is wrong, you can request it be fixedor you can back out of the sale. Its rarely advisable to waive an inspection contingency. Although the average home inspection costs $300 to $500, its a drop in the bucket considering the costly home issues you might uncover, says Claude McGavic, executive director of the National Association of Home Inspectors.


Appraisal contingency: With this contingency, a third party hired by your mortgage lender evaluates the fair market value of the home. If the appraised value is less than the sale price, the contingency enables you to back out of the deal without forfeiting your earnest money deposit....READ MORE HERE.

Deciding to buy your first home is a little scary. Looking for a home is anxiety-inducing. But actually making an offer? That's a whole different level of panic. Are you choosing the right one? What if you buy this home and the perfect place comes on the market a week later? What if you end up hating the place in a year?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all formula for first homes. (If there were, we’d tell you.) And no, we can't totally destress the process (buying a house is a big deal, after all). But we can help you avoid the biggest mistakes. And, as it turns out, some homes just aren’t right for the average first-time buyer. Go ahead and take a look.

1. The one that's a little too ‘cozy'
You may not have children when you buy your first house. You may not even be planning on children. But those plans could change in the next five to 10 years, and that tiny two-bedroom historic bungalow you’ve been eyeing may go from just right to clown-car small.

Read more here

 

A new home means a fresh start: new paint, a new bedroom, even a fresh take on arranging your old furniture.

But your new space won't feel so wonderful if it's weighed down with junk you didn't bother ditching during the move. Now's the time to purge your home—and we're not talking about just sifting through stacks of magazines while you binge on Netflix.

"Your possessions should have three purposes: function, aesthetic purpose, or sentimental value," says Christina Giaquinto, a professional organizer in Franklin Lakes, NJ. "Pick up each item in your home, and ask yourself, 'Why do I have this item? What does this item do for me?'"
From doodads you picked up at the flea market to jewelry you never wear to a pile of untouched cat toys, there are a lot of things you should toss or donate before packing up the truck. But here are nine of the most common offenders.

1. Old towels and linens
When's the last time you bought new towels? If it's the last time you moved, turn those suckers into rags and buy something new. After years of use and hundreds of washings, there's no denying your fluffy bath towels have lost some of their plushness.

Ditch old bed sheets, too. Fitted sheets lose their elasticity over time, and exposure to sweat and oil can cause unpleasant stains.

2. Your juicer
Read more here

For years, all home buyers have heard is that prices are going up, up, and away. But the cost of buying a newly constructed abode has fallen to its lowest price point of the last 12 months. So if you've been wanting to buy a home that's never been touched by another owner, we give you permission do a happy dance.

The median price of a new home dropped nearly 6.9% from March to April to reach $312,400, according to a joint report by the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. That was only up 0.4% from April 2017, less than inflation.

"This could be a sign that builders are trying to build at lower price points," says realtor.com® Chief Economist Danielle Hale. That would be a boon to the many would-be homeowners, particularly first-time buyers or those on a tight budget, who are being priced out of the market. "The largest share of home buyers and home shoppers in the market are looking to buy entry-level homes."

Hale pointed out that 5% of new-home sales were for abodes priced under $150,000. That may not sound like much, but it's the largest share we've seen at that super-desirable price point since August 2016.

However, new homes were still about 24.8% more expensive than the $250,400 median cost of an existing home (one that has previously been lived in), according to the most recent data available from the National Association of Realtors®.

That's because new homes have pricier finishes and appliances, with no wear and tear on anything. Plus, land, labor, and building materials costs have been on the rise.

Meanwhile, the number of new homes sold and for sale dipped 1.5% from the previous month to about 662,000, according to the report. They rose, however, 11.6% from the same month a year earlier. Read more here.